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Keep Your Engine Healthy

When it’s time for us to service our vehicle, we often tend to get confused as to what kind of engine oil should we fill. There are mainly three types of engine oils and we’ve decided to break them down in detail to help you figure out the best engine oil to choose for your motor bike.

Full Synthetic Oil: The most refined oil you could find is created using man-made and precisely controlled materials. Synthetic oils have lesser impurities than conventional motor oils and have better properties. They also have longer shelf life compared to mineral or conventional oils. Synthetic oils are preferred mostly for performance bikes because of its refined properties. The only downside is that these oils are a little expensive.

Semi Synthetic Oil: It is a blend of non-conventional and high performance fluid additives with conventional engine oil. Semi Synthetic oils are a fine balance between the performance of synthetic oils and the protection of mineral oils. Usually, this type of oil is used in low capacity engines, mostly 125–180 cc bikes. You can change to semi synthetic oil once your bike has reached the final stages of its engine run-in.

Mineral Oil: Before the advent of oil making technologies, oils were made from petroleum products. Even today, such engine oils are made, known as mineral oils. This type of engine oil is recommended for smaller capacity bikes and when you buy a new bike and it is still being run-in, as mineral oils help protect the engine better. Although mineral oil does not last for a long number of kilometers, they cost quite low and hence frequent oil changes wouldn’t hurt your pockets much.

Engine oils also come with different grades that classify the oils by its viscosity at varying temperatures. If you notice an engine oil bottle, you would usually see something like 20W40 mentioned in bold on the package, where “W” stands for “winter” and the numbers mean the low and high temperatures at which the oil protects the engine. Let us take 10W40 for example — which means 10 is the low temperature designation and 30 is the high temperature designation. We would recommend you to stick with the engine oil recommended by your manufacturer, although you can change your engine oil based on the climatic conditions of your location.

When it’s time for us to service our vehicle, we often tend to get confused as to what kind of engine oil should we fill. There are mainly three types of engine oils and we’ve decided to break them down in detail to help you figure out the best engine oil to choose for your motor bike.

Full Synthetic Oil: The most refined oil you could find is created using man-made and precisely controlled materials. Synthetic oils have lesser impurities than conventional motor oils and have better properties. They also have longer shelf life compared to mineral or conventional oils. Synthetic oils are preferred mostly for performance bikes because of its refined properties. The only downside is that these oils are a little expensive.

Semi Synthetic Oil: It is a blend of non-conventional and high performance fluid additives with conventional engine oil. Semi Synthetic oils are a fine balance between the performance of synthetic oils and the protection of mineral oils. Usually, this type of oil is used in low capacity engines, mostly 125–180 cc bikes. You can change to semi synthetic oil once your bike has reached the final stages of its engine run-in.

Mineral Oil: Before the advent of oil making technologies, oils were made from petroleum products. Even today, such engine oils are made, known as mineral oils. This type of engine oil is recommended for smaller capacity bikes and when you buy a new bike and it is still being run-in, as mineral oils help protect the engine better. Although mineral oil does not last for a long number of kilometers, they cost quite low and hence frequent oil changes wouldn’t hurt your pockets much.

Engine oils also come with different grades that classify the oils by its viscosity at varying temperatures. If you notice an engine oil bottle, you would usually see something like 20W40 mentioned in bold on the package, where “W” stands for “winter” and the numbers mean the low and high temperatures at which the oil protects the engine. Let us take 10W40 for example — which means 10 is the low temperature designation and 30 is the high temperature designation. We would recommend you to stick with the engine oil recommended by your manufacturer, although you can change your engine oil based on the climatic conditions of your location.